plenty.

(Nope, not talking about the applesauce! I’m only halfway through the bushel.)

I walked into the university bookstore on my way to lecture yesterday to grab a few more brightly colored pens, in anticipation of the scribbling I’ll be doing as I revise my own work this weekend and the pile of papers my students will be turning in on Monday. On my way in, Plenty, by Diana Henry, caught my eye. I picked it up, and after flipping through it, I walked all the way around the table it was on in order to find the other copies. When I wasn’t able to locate them, I decided that I just couldn’t bear to put this copy down, and so it came home with me.

I don’t think I’ve ever taken pictures of the inside of a cookbook before, but this book is gorgeous. Thick paper, saturated colors, beautifully-staged photography, mouth-watering recipes — all aimed at the “home cook.” (That’s me!) This cookbook contains a nice range of meat and veggie options, with lots of discussion about leftovers. This is a cookbook about eating and living well while being conscious of the politics of growing, preparing, and eating food. I’m a mostly-vegetarian cook because I can’t always source (or afford) the kind of meat I am comfortable eating — meat from animals raised kindly and locally, on farms that care about long term ecological health. Diana Henry provides advice for a cook with my politics, and offers an impressive number of recipes for “less popular” cuts of meat — the kind that maybe someone like me can afford from a local farmer. She thinks about refrigerator continuity — a weekend roast that serves as the base for several other possibilities later in the week.

Can you tell I’m excited about this book?

I am also incredibly excited about this blanket — so much so that I’d like to submit it instead of the paper I’m revising to my department for consideration. (Too bad that’s not really an option.) I’m working on the last section of the blanket before the border, and I cannot wait to curl up with this on the couch. Hopefully I’ll have some FOs around here soon, in both written and knitted form…

 

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9 thoughts on “plenty.

  1. Wishing you success with your paper! Blanket: looks lovely! just how big will this be? Spacious enough for an adult to curl up under?

  2. Best of luck on the paper! The cookbook looks intriguing (and yummy!) I will have to look into it.

    The blanket looks just lovely with all your pretty handspun. Can’t wait to see the finished product!

  3. P.S. – I just finished my first Windschief (for my husband, with plans for 2 more for my sons). Seeing your FO a luittle while back was the inspiration for me to buy the pattern, and I am so glad I did! I love the pattern, and also the Shelter yarn I chose to use. (I think you’d love Shelter, too).

  4. Great looking cookbook! I may have to go and find this one. The last one you recommended I own and love. I thought of you as I made the Wheat Berry Salad with citrus dressing this week- my skeptical DH had seconds and then thirds. It was delicious and went well with roasted chicken. Good luck with your paper. Can’t wait to see the blanket as an FO.

  5. I’m a cookbook aficionado myself — this one looks amazing and is totally new to me!

    The blanket looks so cozy. How big is it? Can’t wait to see the FO!

    I’ve been curling up under my Hemlock Ring in the evening lately, and it’s great. The larger size turned out to be just perfect.

  6. That cookbook looks amazing! I am not by any means an aficionado … but it all looks delicious. Yay for the blanket! It’s the perfect season for lap blankets.

  7. Book sounds fab – funnily enough one of my favourite recipe books is also called Plenty but is by Yotam Ottolenghi, a pretty well known restaurant/deli owner and writer of a wonderful vegetarian recipe column over here, in the newspaper I read. The book publishes a lot of recipes from the column as well as others, it’s here:
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/series/thenewvegetarian
    – I definitely recommend it if you cook a lot of vegetarian food, it’s imaginative but all remains so realistic to make on an everyday sort of a basis.

    I love that line on the cover, “with over 300 recipes, none of them extravagant”. Have just added that book to my Amazon wishlist & seen she is the same woman who wrote the recipe book with the best title EVER, “Crazy water, pickled lemons” which I’ve had my eye on for ages.

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